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Guest Project: Flowered Wipes Container

17 Jun
Hello Tatertots & Jello readers! Let me introduce myself….my name is Ellie g. Well, really it’s not. My name is Lara. But I go by Ellie g on my blog.
Why?
I don’t know.
Maybe it’s because I always wanted a nickname…and no one would call me T-Bone. (oops…blatant Seinfeld reference. If you don’t get it…skip)

Anyway, I have this little blog called Less Cake {more frosting}. I like to share snippets of life around my house. We have lots of great ideas, lots of Diet Coke, and lots of laughs!

Mostly, I’m trying not to need a change of underware….as I prepare to make a post on my very favorite blog of E-V-E-R! Jen has been so nice to me, and has helped me want to blog away in my own corner of the blogosphere. I’m so honored to be here!

DEEP BREATH.

Okay, enough Mount Gushmore….you want a new idea…don’t you?

Today I want to share a really cute, (I mean REALLY CUTE) and really easy idea for new mommies. (or old mommies…I think I need one…even though my youngest is 3 years old)

I wish it had a fancy name. I just call it “The Wipes Band”. You can call it whatever you want. Well…don’t call it tacky, or ugly. That’s not nice.


Start with your materials. You’ll need big elastic. I mean BIG. I’m using 3″ thick elastic. It would work with a little thinner. But it does need to be thick. I found this elastic at JoAnns. It’s not expensive.
Then you’ll need your material. If you’re planning on embellishing with material, you’ll need some coordinating colors as well. But we’ll get to that in a minute.

  • get a box of wet wipes. Measure loosely around the perimeter. Then cut about 1.5″ – 2″ off that measurement to make sure the elastic will fit tightly. I always use Huggies wipes. That box measurement ends up being 22″.
  • You’ll need to cut your fabric double the width of your elastic plus 1.5″ (for seams and fit). So if you’re using the 3″ elastic, you’ll need 7.5″ inches. You want the length to be AT LEAST double your elastic.
  • The fast answer is: I used 22″ elastic, and 7.5″ inches material x the entire width of my fabric (45″)


Take the long tube, and pin the sides together so that the “right sides” of the fabric are facing each other. (***do I have to pin it? Well, no, but if you can’t keep it straight, I’d suggest it. No unpicking when you pin to begin with.
Wow. I just turned into my mother!)

Sew along the length with a 1/4″ seam. (re-inforce both ends, just to be safe)


When it’s all done, turn the tube inside out.


Now you need to pull your elastic through your tube. There will be A LOT more fabric than there is elastic. But I’m not opposed to giving the tricks away….

  • Put a large safety pin on the end of your elastic. The pin will help you guide your elastic through.
  • Once you get the elastic in (just to the opposite end) twist your tube so that the seam is on the top edge of the elastic. Then, go to your sewing machine and sew right along the back edge. Close to the end. Raw edges aren’t a problem. So just sew across. Making sure you catch both sides of the material and the elastic, and that your seam is right at the top.
  • Now that your back end is sewed, it can’t pull through. (subsequently making you swear. See how I’m looking our for you?)
  • Push all the fabric down until your elastic comes out through the top of the tube. Remove your safety pin.
  • Then tuck the raw edges of your tube inside (to finish the edges a little) then sew that side shut. (I like to pin the second end, just to make sure it’s all straight.)
  • Once both ends are sewed, you can distribute the gathers so that they’re even.


Pin the two ends together. Overlapping the ends by about a 1/2″. (make sure your “finished” one is on top.

Then sew right down the middle. I usually sew 2 or 3 times, just to make sure that it doesn’t pop when stretched.

Guess what? You’re done. Well, mostly. Now comes the fun part. To cover up the front seam, you can embellish.

Did that say EMBELLISH? Oh yay! (I love this part)

I’ve used ribbon, buttons, ric rac, bling…oh the possibilities are endless. Today I used the ruffled and rolled fabric flowers. Wanna see?

These are just hand sewn on to the front. That seam is just a memory now!!


C’est Fini. (That’s French for…it’s finished. That’s right. I’m classy that way!)

I just love these for quick, and personal, baby gifts. And sometimes I’ll pair it with a personalized travel wipes case as well. But that’s a lesson for another day, isn’t it?

Thank you SOOO much for letting me come over today, Jen! AH-MAZING!
Come over and see us at Less Cake {more frosting}.
We love visitors.
(but bring your own frosting. I don’t share)

Thanks for coming over Lara! I love that wipes container. I need to make one ASAP! Here’s a button for sharing your tutorial with us!
You really need to check out Lara’s blog — Less Cake {more frosting}. She is just amazing!

Polka Dot Pots!!

Big Loves for this Chore Chart!

Love this Calendar!
Have a Fabulous Thursday!
XOXO

Guest Project: Flowered Wipes Container

17 Jun
Hello Tatertots & Jello readers! Let me introduce myself….my name is Ellie g. Well, really it’s not. My name is Lara. But I go by Ellie g on my blog.
Why?
I don’t know.
Maybe it’s because I always wanted a nickname…and no one would call me T-Bone. (oops…blatant Seinfeld reference. If you don’t get it…skip)

Anyway, I have this little blog called Less Cake {more frosting}. I like to share snippets of life around my house. We have lots of great ideas, lots of Diet Coke, and lots of laughs!

Mostly, I’m trying not to need a change of underware….as I prepare to make a post on my very favorite blog of E-V-E-R! Jen has been so nice to me, and has helped me want to blog away in my own corner of the blogosphere. I’m so honored to be here!

DEEP BREATH.

Okay, enough Mount Gushmore….you want a new idea…don’t you?

Today I want to share a really cute, (I mean REALLY CUTE) and really easy idea for new mommies. (or old mommies…I think I need one…even though my youngest is 3 years old)

I wish it had a fancy name. I just call it “The Wipes Band”. You can call it whatever you want. Well…don’t call it tacky, or ugly. That’s not nice.


Start with your materials. You’ll need big elastic. I mean BIG. I’m using 3″ thick elastic. It would work with a little thinner. But it does need to be thick. I found this elastic at JoAnns. It’s not expensive.
Then you’ll need your material. If you’re planning on embellishing with material, you’ll need some coordinating colors as well. But we’ll get to that in a minute.

  • get a box of wet wipes. Measure loosely around the perimeter. Then cut about 1.5″ – 2″ off that measurement to make sure the elastic will fit tightly. I always use Huggies wipes. That box measurement ends up being 22″.
  • You’ll need to cut your fabric double the width of your elastic plus 1.5″ (for seams and fit). So if you’re using the 3″ elastic, you’ll need 7.5″ inches. You want the length to be AT LEAST double your elastic.
  • The fast answer is: I used 22″ elastic, and 7.5″ inches material x the entire width of my fabric (45″)


Take the long tube, and pin the sides together so that the “right sides” of the fabric are facing each other. (***do I have to pin it? Well, no, but if you can’t keep it straight, I’d suggest it. No unpicking when you pin to begin with.
Wow. I just turned into my mother!)

Sew along the length with a 1/4″ seam. (re-inforce both ends, just to be safe)


When it’s all done, turn the tube inside out.


Now you need to pull your elastic through your tube. There will be A LOT more fabric than there is elastic. But I’m not opposed to giving the tricks away….

  • Put a large safety pin on the end of your elastic. The pin will help you guide your elastic through.
  • Once you get the elastic in (just to the opposite end) twist your tube so that the seam is on the top edge of the elastic. Then, go to your sewing machine and sew right along the back edge. Close to the end. Raw edges aren’t a problem. So just sew across. Making sure you catch both sides of the material and the elastic, and that your seam is right at the top.
  • Now that your back end is sewed, it can’t pull through. (subsequently making you swear. See how I’m looking our for you?)
  • Push all the fabric down until your elastic comes out through the top of the tube. Remove your safety pin.
  • Then tuck the raw edges of your tube inside (to finish the edges a little) then sew that side shut. (I like to pin the second end, just to make sure it’s all straight.)
  • Once both ends are sewed, you can distribute the gathers so that they’re even.


Pin the two ends together. Overlapping the ends by about a 1/2″. (make sure your “finished” one is on top.

Then sew right down the middle. I usually sew 2 or 3 times, just to make sure that it doesn’t pop when stretched.

Guess what? You’re done. Well, mostly. Now comes the fun part. To cover up the front seam, you can embellish.

Did that say EMBELLISH? Oh yay! (I love this part)

I’ve used ribbon, buttons, ric rac, bling…oh the possibilities are endless. Today I used the ruffled and rolled fabric flowers. Wanna see?

These are just hand sewn on to the front. That seam is just a memory now!!


C’est Fini. (That’s French for…it’s finished. That’s right. I’m classy that way!)

I just love these for quick, and personal, baby gifts. And sometimes I’ll pair it with a personalized travel wipes case as well. But that’s a lesson for another day, isn’t it?

Thank you SOOO much for letting me come over today, Jen! AH-MAZING!
Come over and see us at Less Cake {more frosting}.
We love visitors.
(but bring your own frosting. I don’t share)

Thanks for coming over Lara! I love that wipes container. I need to make one ASAP! Here’s a button for sharing your tutorial with us!
You really need to check out Lara’s blog — Less Cake {more frosting}. She is just amazing!

Polka Dot Pots!!

Big Loves for this Chore Chart!

Love this Calendar!
Have a Fabulous Thursday!
XOXO

Guest Project: Mod ‘Filing Cabinet’

21 May

PotHolesandPantyhose
Hello all you Tatertots and Jello readers! I’m Rebekah from Potholes & Pantyhose and I am excited to be guest blogging here today. At Potholes & Pantyhose, I blog about touring with my musician hubby, my home life-which usually involves some type of remodeling project, my photography, and any Arts and Crap that I happen to make. I try to maintain a somewhat normal life. However, normalcy keeps escaping me.

Today, I have a quick and simple little project that will turn your functional filing cabinet into a modern conversational piece. I was tired of the clunky metal object mocking me from the rest of my very ‘cool’ office. I was inspired by something similar in Ready Made magazine and just had to try it on my own, of course putting my own little spin on it.

What you will need:
Filing Cabinet-I picked mine up from craigslist for $15
Contact Paper-I chose a wood grain birch (found at Lowe’s)
2’ or 4’ level
Exacto Knife/Scissors
Pencil

Using your level, draw a straight line across the middle of your filing cabinet. This will be the end point for your contact paper. I chose to put the line about a third of the way down of the filing cabinet, instead of a predictable half-way mark, just to make things interesting. I don’t like to be predictable…
(Picture #4)

Using your level, draw lines at 3”, 2” and 1” of thickness onto the contact paper to make the stripes. The angle you choose to have your contact paper at on the filing cabinet and the depth of your cabinet will dictate how long your strips need to be. Cut your differing width of stripes from the contact paper, overcompensating for the length.

I temporarily taped all of my stripes to the side of the filing cabinet, and adjusted them until I liked the look of them, before permanently adhering them to the cabinet. I have learned to do this the hard way. Let’s just say it is very difficult to remove contact paper from anything. Next, I drew little ‘tick’ marks onto the filing cabinet, notating where each stripe went, so I would remember in what order to adhere them to the cabinet.

Using a level, draw a line across the bottom of your taped contact paper stripes that coincides with the line you had originally drawn on the actual filing cabinet. This will
make the bottom angle on your stripes. Remove your stripes and cut the tips off with your exacto knife or a pair of scissors.

Peel off the backing from the contact paper and begin placing your stripes onto the filing cabinet, following your earlier notations. Smooth out the bubbles as you go.

Use your exacto knife to cut the top of your stripe off, leaving about an 1/8” to wrap around to the other side.

Repeat this process around the entire filing cabinet. If you have recessed pulls like I did, cut your stripes extra long in order to tuck the contact paper up and around your pulls. When placing the stripes on the drawers, cut them extra long in order to wrap around the edges of each drawer.

Now you have a ‘very cool’ filing cabinet! No more mocking us, Mr. Clunky Filing Cabinet!
Come and visit me, Rebekah, at Potholes & Pantyhose to see more of my Arts & Crap projects!
Thanks Tatertots & Jello for having me today!

Thanks Rebekah! I love your blog and your wonderful projects! Here’s a button for sharing your great idea with us!
Check out Potholes & Pantyhose for more great projects!

And come back tonight and link up to the Weekend Wrap Up Party — 

it starts at 10 PM.
 Happy Friday!
XOXO

Guest Project: Mod ‘Filing Cabinet’

21 May

PotHolesandPantyhose
Hello all you Tatertots and Jello readers! I’m Rebekah from Potholes & Pantyhose and I am excited to be guest blogging here today. At Potholes & Pantyhose, I blog about touring with my musician hubby, my home life-which usually involves some type of remodeling project, my photography, and any Arts and Crap that I happen to make. I try to maintain a somewhat normal life. However, normalcy keeps escaping me.

Today, I have a quick and simple little project that will turn your functional filing cabinet into a modern conversational piece. I was tired of the clunky metal object mocking me from the rest of my very ‘cool’ office. I was inspired by something similar in Ready Made magazine and just had to try it on my own, of course putting my own little spin on it.

What you will need:
Filing Cabinet-I picked mine up from craigslist for $15
Contact Paper-I chose a wood grain birch (found at Lowe’s)
2’ or 4’ level
Exacto Knife/Scissors
Pencil

Using your level, draw a straight line across the middle of your filing cabinet. This will be the end point for your contact paper. I chose to put the line about a third of the way down of the filing cabinet, instead of a predictable half-way mark, just to make things interesting. I don’t like to be predictable…
(Picture #4)

Using your level, draw lines at 3”, 2” and 1” of thickness onto the contact paper to make the stripes. The angle you choose to have your contact paper at on the filing cabinet and the depth of your cabinet will dictate how long your strips need to be. Cut your differing width of stripes from the contact paper, overcompensating for the length.

I temporarily taped all of my stripes to the side of the filing cabinet, and adjusted them until I liked the look of them, before permanently adhering them to the cabinet. I have learned to do this the hard way. Let’s just say it is very difficult to remove contact paper from anything. Next, I drew little ‘tick’ marks onto the filing cabinet, notating where each stripe went, so I would remember in what order to adhere them to the cabinet.

Using a level, draw a line across the bottom of your taped contact paper stripes that coincides with the line you had originally drawn on the actual filing cabinet. This will
make the bottom angle on your stripes. Remove your stripes and cut the tips off with your exacto knife or a pair of scissors.

Peel off the backing from the contact paper and begin placing your stripes onto the filing cabinet, following your earlier notations. Smooth out the bubbles as you go.

Use your exacto knife to cut the top of your stripe off, leaving about an 1/8” to wrap around to the other side.

Repeat this process around the entire filing cabinet. If you have recessed pulls like I did, cut your stripes extra long in order to tuck the contact paper up and around your pulls. When placing the stripes on the drawers, cut them extra long in order to wrap around the edges of each drawer.

Now you have a ‘very cool’ filing cabinet! No more mocking us, Mr. Clunky Filing Cabinet!
Come and visit me, Rebekah, at Potholes & Pantyhose to see more of my Arts & Crap projects!
Thanks Tatertots & Jello for having me today!

Thanks Rebekah! I love your blog and your wonderful projects! Here’s a button for sharing your great idea with us!
Check out Potholes & Pantyhose for more great projects!

And come back tonight and link up to the Weekend Wrap Up Party — 

it starts at 10 PM.
 Happy Friday!
XOXO

Cute and Funny Guest Project from Somewhat Simple

30 Apr
Happy Friday Everyone!!!
I’m Stephanie from SomewhatSimple
I am super excited to be on Jen’s darling blog. It seems like Jen and I run in the same creative circle, but have yet to cross paths! Time to change that here today!

Today I thought I would share with you a very simple project that should get a few laughs if you make one for your home. I call it “The Exercise Block” and before any of you tune me out, let me remind you that this is funny, no exercise required!

Take A Look:

Materials Needed:
1 block, any size. (mine was a 4×4)
Scrapbook Paper
Mod Podge
Sponge Brush
Ribbon
Printed Directions
You can use this image if you’d like:

(Right click on the image to save it, then copy it to a word doc, adjust the size to fit your block and print. I make things easy for you!) 

Here are the Easy Directions of this Tutorial:
1. Cut 6 squares of your scrapbook paper to fit your block
2. Mod Podge the paper to the sides of the block by adding a thin layer of Mod Podge to the wood, then lay your paper on that, then add another thin layer of Mod Podge to the top. Let it dry completely.

3. Mod Podge your Directions Sheet to one side of the block, then let it dry completely.

4. I chose to distress the edges with a sander just a bit, but that is up to you. Now just pick a ribbon and tie it up with a bow.

And that’s it!!!!
My kind of exercise!

I would love to have you come visit me at somewhat simple and see what else I’ve been up to! Every day is different and each day is something fun! If you come right now, you can still add your link to our Strut Your Stuff Link Party that I host everything Thursday. Consider yourself personally invited!

Jen, thanks for having me as your guest today!
Have a great weekend everyone!

Thanks Steph! If you haven’t made your way over to Somewhat Simple — you are missing out big time! Steph’s blog is a beautiful wonderland of crafty goodness! 

I’m sharing a little polka dot project over at Somewhat Simple today!
And a reminder — the Weekend Wrap Up Party will be starting tonight at midnight. I have a great new sponsor and giveaway this week for those of you who want to come to the party! See you then!!!
XOXO

Cute and Funny Guest Project from Somewhat Simple

30 Apr
Happy Friday Everyone!!!
I’m Stephanie from SomewhatSimple
I am super excited to be on Jen’s darling blog. It seems like Jen and I run in the same creative circle, but have yet to cross paths! Time to change that here today!

Today I thought I would share with you a very simple project that should get a few laughs if you make one for your home. I call it “The Exercise Block” and before any of you tune me out, let me remind you that this is funny, no exercise required!

Take A Look:

Materials Needed:
1 block, any size. (mine was a 4×4)
Scrapbook Paper
Mod Podge
Sponge Brush
Ribbon
Printed Directions
You can use this image if you’d like:

(Right click on the image to save it, then copy it to a word doc, adjust the size to fit your block and print. I make things easy for you!) 

Here are the Easy Directions of this Tutorial:
1. Cut 6 squares of your scrapbook paper to fit your block
2. Mod Podge the paper to the sides of the block by adding a thin layer of Mod Podge to the wood, then lay your paper on that, then add another thin layer of Mod Podge to the top. Let it dry completely.

3. Mod Podge your Directions Sheet to one side of the block, then let it dry completely.

4. I chose to distress the edges with a sander just a bit, but that is up to you. Now just pick a ribbon and tie it up with a bow.

And that’s it!!!!
My kind of exercise!

I would love to have you come visit me at somewhat simple and see what else I’ve been up to! Every day is different and each day is something fun! If you come right now, you can still add your link to our Strut Your Stuff Link Party that I host everything Thursday. Consider yourself personally invited!

Jen, thanks for having me as your guest today!
Have a great weekend everyone!

Thanks Steph! If you haven’t made your way over to Somewhat Simple — you are missing out big time! Steph’s blog is a beautiful wonderland of crafty goodness! 

I’m sharing a little polka dot project over at Somewhat Simple today!
And a reminder — the Weekend Wrap Up Party will be starting tonight at midnight. I have a great new sponsor and giveaway this week for those of you who want to come to the party! See you then!!!
XOXO

Guest Project: Chicken Wire Frame Tutorial & Clutch Giveaway!

28 Apr

Good morning! I have a treat for you today. I would like to introduce you to a really fun girl — my friend Jen from Dangerously Domestic! Seriously, how cool is that logo? Jen is a really upbeat, creative girl full of fun ideas. She is here to share a fun tutorial AND she is having a fantastic giveaway too! Take it away Jen!!!
Hi there Tatertots & Jello fans. I’m Jen of Dangerously Domestic. 
I kind of feel like I snuck in here because I certainly don’t belong . 
OH but I’m super happy to be here. 
I adore Jen , she is not only super talented but just a very generous and kind gal.
Thanks for having me today young lady!
Alright just let me finish my lunch and then lets get to the Tutorial!
It was a rainy , rainy day today just want to put that out there in defense of my pictures!
I’ve been dreaming of using some chicken wire in one of my projects ever since we put some over our square foot garden to keep the neighbor cats out of it.
Here’s what I came up with.
I’ve had this frame layin around for awhile and it was already white so I thought voila!
I just took the mat board out and the glass. You can save them for a different project . Ok, don’t know the technical name for it but you know the thing that holds all the pictures in on the back. You know! Well, that is what you are going to be attaching everything to. I knew that I would be adding some width to the sides of it so I just took some sharp scissors and cut a bit off the edges.
I measured the back thingy and then out to the garage I went to cut my chicken wire. You can buy chicken wire at places like Home Depot or Lowes. Using some wire cutters I cut the wire just about a half square bigger then the back board.
Spray painted it black. Put something under it or you will have a neat faux finish on your garage floor. The hubby won’t appreciate your handywork.
Pick out a great piece of fabric and like the wire cut it about 1/2 inch to an inch bigger all the way around. I went with gingham . Something about gingham & chicken wire.
I used to hate gingham – no I really hated it. Now I’m in love with it. This was a bit bright for where I wanted to put it.
No biggie! I just dipped it in a little bath of Tan Rit Dye and I had the color I was after.
You don’t have to do this step but I think it makes it look nicer. I added a layer of warm & white . Just hot glue it on or use any adhesive of your choice.
Next, I wrapped the fabric around and glued it to the back. It looks sloppy but I swear I neatened it up a bit. No one will see it .
Now this part was a bit tricky but only because the wire wants to curl up. I just held it flat with one hand and stapled it with the other. A regular old stapler did the trick just fine.
Now just pop it into the frame and secure it with a bit of hot glue at the corners.
Now just make your favorite fabric flower and embellish it.
If you would like to know how I made my fabric flowers hop over to my blog &  I will be glad to show you!
Again, sorry about the pics !
Here are a couple of my past projects.
Pear Shaped Book
T-shirt makeover

Just for fun I thought i would have a little giveaway for Jen’s readers. I’m giving away one of these clutches. Do you recognize this pattern? Noodlehead has the pattern for these over on her blog. http://noodleheads.blogspot.com/
Come over to my blog & find out how to enter.


Thanks for listening to me go on & on! Thanks again Jen. This was fun!

Smiles & Big Big Love,
Jen

Thanks Jen! What a happy project. I love it and the flowers are so cute! That picture of you eating the tatertots and jello is cracking me up!!!

Feel free to take this button for sharing your tutorial with us. 

And thanks for having such a great giveaway too — I will be over in a minute to enter!

Also, be sure to stop by Beth @ Stories of A to Z’s Vignette party today and see all of the loveliness!

XOXO

Guest Project: Multi-Purpose Memo Board Tutorial

23 Apr

 I’m so excited to introduce you to one of my friends — Tam from Sew Dang Cute! Tam is the sweetest and makes wonderful projects! We are doing a fun swap today. She is sharing one of her fantastic creations, and I’m sharing one of mine over at Sew Dang Cute! So here she is —–

Hi, I’m Tam from Sew Dang Cute. I am super excited to be guest blogging today with all you Tatertots & Jello readers! Jen is one of the sweetest and friendliest people I’ve met through blogging, and like all of you, I LOVE her blog!!!!! I am so honored to be here today! If you want to know a little bit more about me, pop over to my blog to check it out. For now…..

I am going to share with you how to make this multi-purpose memo board. Let’s get started shall we?
Materials Needed:

  • Piece of wood 21″ x 19″ (mine was 3/8″ thick)
  • Three frames (or you can just use cardboard and transparency paper)
  • Cork Board
  • Batting
  • Fabric – 1/4 yd for frames, 1/4 yd center piece, 1 yd corkboard and cover wood piece
  • 3 yds ribbon
  • 8 buttons
  • Cardboard
  • Paper stapler/staples
  • Mod-Podge
  • E6000, Epoxy, or some other similar type of glue

1. Cut a piece of fabric slightly larger than your piece of wood and lay the wood on top of it. Clip each corner as shown below. Apply Mod-Podge to the wood and fold fabric over to glue in place. Once all four sides are folded over and glued down, apply Mod-Podge on top of all the fabric. We are only working with the back side. Do not apply any Mod-Podge to the front. Set aside to dry.
2. Grab your frames. I bought these paperish ones at Hobby Lobby for $1.99 each, but I had to rip them apart like so. All you need is the top of the frame and the transparency sheet, so really you can just use cardboard and transparency paper. Cover the frames with fabric and Mod-Podge similar to step 1, but this time cut out the center of the fabric as well. I left about 1/2″ to fold over. Clip at a diagonal into each of the inside corners, then fold over and Mod-Podge. Once all four sides are folded up and glued in place, apply Mod-Podge on top of all the fabric, again only to the back. Set aside to dry.
3. Cut a piece of cardboard and batting 21″ x 8″, and fabric slightly larger than the piece of cardboard. Layer fabric right side down, batting, then cardboard. Cover with Mod-Podge just like in step 1. Set aside to dry.
4. Cut a piece of cardboard 21″ x 6″. Draw a 1″ frame on the cardboard. Cut out the center piece along the lines you just drew, so you have a big frame. Cover with fabric and Mod-Podge just like we did the photo frames and set aside to dry.
5. Once everything is dry, staple the piece of transparency paper to the back of the photo frames, the cork board to the back of the frame we made in step 4 (if possible, use two layers of cork board here or thicker cork board), and the ribbon to the back of the center piece we made in step 3. Hand stitch the buttons to the center piece where the ribbons criss-cross, so your final middle piece looks like this.
6. Using E6000, Epoxy, or another similar type of strong glue, glue all the pieces to the front of your memo board. I put my photo frames on top (make sure you don’t glue the top side of the frames…you want to be able to put pictures in those frames). I put the center piece from step 3 in the middle, and the corkboard piece on the bottom. Here is the final result. Add some pictures, reminder notes, coupons, etc., and you now have a multi-purpose memo board. The last step is to attach your preferred hanging hardware. I like these sawtooth thingys. That’s it! I hope you enjoyed that tutorial! Please come visit me at Sew Dang Cute for more tutorials, ideas, giveaways, etc. I also sell fabric and patterns, so you’ll have to come check those out as well!! Thanks so much Jen for letting me take the reins today!

Thanks Tam for the great tutorial and CUTE project!  
It’s Dang Cute!  
You really need to check out Tam’s blog — it’s so inspiring!
Thanks for coming by!
Have a Fantastic Friday!!!
XOXO

Do You Shoot on "automatic"? How to Take a Fantastic Picture!

15 Apr
7

I’m really excited to introduce you to someone special!

My sister — Wenderful!  
I know I’ve talked about her a bunch on my blog. She is the person that got me blogging. She also is an amazing photographer. 
She even won the *I Heart Faces* Blogoversary contest! And she has spend YEARS studying photography. As someone who shoots on “automatic” most of the time, I thought it would be fun to have her come over and give us a few tips from a pro!
73
black-white
{she took this picture of my Hannah}
She also has an amazing “365” blog.  
a.m.a.z.i.n.g
I’ve been there.
You’ve been there.
You’ve finally rounded up the kids, wiped the remaining lunch off their faces, wrestled the swords from their grasp, bribed them into standing together without punching, pulling, or poking one another, and you swiftly flip on the camera and snap their picture before chaos ensues. Only to check the back of the camera to find something similar to this:

Look familiar?
This is what I call A Snapshot.  Unfortunately most of us have at least a handful of snapshots in our photo files.  Believe it or not, it only takes a little thought,  a few seconds of planning, and a touch of creativity to change a snapshot into a memorable portrait.  
In this series of posts, we’re going to dissect
The Anatomy of A Snapshot
I’m going to give you tips on how to take better pictures of your family.
There are six main ingredients that make up A Snapshot.
1.  Limb chops
2.  Cluttered background
3.  Distance from your subject
4.  Poor composition
5.  Fake smiles
6.  Poor exposure
Let’s start with limb chopping.  Fingers, toes, hands, feet, elbows, knees.  It’s a common offense among people with cameras.  It’s easy to do and you don’t notice it until you start clicking through your photos or files.
“That’s a great picture!  Awww, too bad little Johnny is missing his left hand. “
or
“What a sweet shot of Grandma!  Awww, too bad she has no feet.”
I’ve done it plenty of times.  Ruined a perfectly good shot by chopping vital body parts.
Take a look through your own photo files and take note of how many vital appendages are missing in your pictures.  Sometimes you’ll shoot close up and you won’t have enough room to include the entire limb.  In that case, avoid chopping at joints.  Shoot in a way that your chopping looks intentional.  A “planned chop”, if you will.
You get the idea.  Pay attention to those outer appendages and include them in your photos whenever possible.  It’s usually just a matter of being aware of what you’re  filling your frame with and recomposing a fraction of an inch.   It could mean the difference between A Snapshot and a Memorable Portrait.
Next week:  Cluttered backgrounds
***
Thanks Wenderful!
If you want some great picture ideas, check out her 365 blog!

52 ... Things I Love (mail)
78

69

XOXO

Do You Shoot on "automatic"? How to Take a Fantastic Picture!

15 Apr
7

I’m really excited to introduce you to someone special!

My sister — Wenderful!  
I know I’ve talked about her a bunch on my blog. She is the person that got me blogging. She also is an amazing photographer. 
She even won the *I Heart Faces* Blogoversary contest! And she has spend YEARS studying photography. As someone who shoots on “automatic” most of the time, I thought it would be fun to have her come over and give us a few tips from a pro!
73
black-white
{she took this picture of my Hannah}
She also has an amazing “365” blog.  
a.m.a.z.i.n.g
I’ve been there.
You’ve been there.
You’ve finally rounded up the kids, wiped the remaining lunch off their faces, wrestled the swords from their grasp, bribed them into standing together without punching, pulling, or poking one another, and you swiftly flip on the camera and snap their picture before chaos ensues. Only to check the back of the camera to find something similar to this:

Look familiar?
This is what I call A Snapshot.  Unfortunately most of us have at least a handful of snapshots in our photo files.  Believe it or not, it only takes a little thought,  a few seconds of planning, and a touch of creativity to change a snapshot into a memorable portrait.  
In this series of posts, we’re going to dissect
The Anatomy of A Snapshot
I’m going to give you tips on how to take better pictures of your family.
There are six main ingredients that make up A Snapshot.
1.  Limb chops
2.  Cluttered background
3.  Distance from your subject
4.  Poor composition
5.  Fake smiles
6.  Poor exposure
Let’s start with limb chopping.  Fingers, toes, hands, feet, elbows, knees.  It’s a common offense among people with cameras.  It’s easy to do and you don’t notice it until you start clicking through your photos or files.
“That’s a great picture!  Awww, too bad little Johnny is missing his left hand. “
or
“What a sweet shot of Grandma!  Awww, too bad she has no feet.”
I’ve done it plenty of times.  Ruined a perfectly good shot by chopping vital body parts.
Take a look through your own photo files and take note of how many vital appendages are missing in your pictures.  Sometimes you’ll shoot close up and you won’t have enough room to include the entire limb.  In that case, avoid chopping at joints.  Shoot in a way that your chopping looks intentional.  A “planned chop”, if you will.
You get the idea.  Pay attention to those outer appendages and include them in your photos whenever possible.  It’s usually just a matter of being aware of what you’re  filling your frame with and recomposing a fraction of an inch.   It could mean the difference between A Snapshot and a Memorable Portrait.
Next week:  Cluttered backgrounds
***
Thanks Wenderful!
If you want some great picture ideas, check out her 365 blog!

52 ... Things I Love (mail)
78

69

XOXO