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Stenciled Faux Roman Shades {tutorial} — Kitchen Sneak Peek

19 Aug


I’m still working on my kitchen redo. I decided I wanted to change things up and make a Roman Curtain for the window above my kitchen sink. And in the spirit of keeping it real, I just want to let you know that the first version was a total sewing fail. I tried to make it no-sew AND Faux and let’s just say that hot glue and white canvas do not mix LOL!

So I started over.

Here’s what I did: 

1. I measured the window and added 3 inches to the length and 2 inches to the 2width. I used my Royal Design Studios Stencil — Chain Link.
2. I found the easiest way to stencil the pattern was the Roller Lite Touch Up Kit from Home Depot.
3. I laid the stencil on the upper corner of the canvas. 
4. After each section, I matched the existing stencil up to the hash marks to be sure it was straight. 
5.I did this until the whole fabric was covered.
6. I used a iron to heat set the paint into the canvas.
7.I used an old bed sheet to make a liner. I stitched the sheet to the canvas, making a “pillow case” and then folded 2 inches at the top over to make room for the spring rod.
8. Then I inserted the rod into the casing and hung the curtain. 
Keeping it real — I discovered that the curtain was a little small for the space, so I sewed some white grosgrain ribbon on each side of the curtain to make it fit the space better. I also think it dresses up the curtain. 

After I made the panel, I posted about it on my TT&J Facebook page, and mentioned was going to make it into a regular roman shade and then Richella from Imparting Grace sent me an email and told me about her “Faux Roman Shade Tutorial” and it was genius.

 [IMG_3532_2_4.JPG]

So I did that! I just inserted two more adjustable spring rods in the window opening and then just folded the panel over the rods to create panels. Be sure to check out her tutorial for more details!!

Super easy. And since I don’t really need privacy in this window since it overlooks an open space, I thought this was a good solution!

I love that the paint in the curtain is the same as my kitchen island!! 

It was hard to get a picture of the actual color of the paint since the sun coming in the window made the paint look so much darker than it really is. The paint is really a really light bluish-green color. The name of the paint is Martha Stewart Rainwater.

I have to say that I love Royal Design Studio Stencils. Their stencils are made out of a heavier material that doesn’t stretch, like some of the other stencils I have tried. And my favorite part? They have marks on the stencil that line up with the previous stenciled areas. So it is super easy to keep the stencil straight and lined up! And I love all of their modern designs!! You can find out about all of their designs at their main website!
Have a Colorful Day!! 
xoxo
PS — It’s Friday!! My favorite day of the week!! Why?? Because it’s the day I get to see what YOU have been working on and feature YOU! Come link up YOUR ideas at the Weekend Wrap Up Party!! It starts at 6 pm {mst}.
book worm apple1 Nine {Free} Back to School Printables!
And, Are you getting for Back to School?? I am sharing NINE Back to School Printable Ideas over at Babble’s Home Ec!!

 PPS — I am linking up to these fun parties – check them out!

The DIY Show OffBCD 125UndertheTableandDreaminggiveawaysTidy Mom I'm Lovin It Fridays

Guest Project — make a Mod Peacock Pillow with PDF{tutorial}

26 Apr

Today’s tutorial is from one of my favorite bloggers. Amy from Positively Splendid. Amy is adorable and she has SPLENDID ideas. I had the treat of meeting her at Blissdom this year and then again at Creative Estates a few weeks ago. She is as adorable in real life as she is on her blog. 

 {here we are with Emily of Decor Chick and Jess of Frugal with a Flourish at Blissdom}
Hello, everyone! I am absolutely over the moon to be sharing a project here at Tatertots and Jello today! Jen’s blog is among the first I ever followed, and I never cease to be inspired by her wealth of creativity. I’ve had the privilege to meet Jen in person twice now, and I have to say that she is just as charming in person as she is on screen!

My name is Amy, and my blogging home is known as Positively Splendid, a place where I share about my passion for all things creative. As a wife and mother of three (with our fourth due in the fall), I find pursuing creative endeavors to be the thing that preserves my own unique identity. I love taking ordinary ingredients and transforming them into something lovely!
My goal is for my blog to be a little haven of crafting and DIY inspiration, and a place where creative people of all skill levels can come and feel right at home. Because I feel strongly that everyone should be equipped to create something beautiful on their own, each and every project at Positively Splendid is explained to the last detail with step-by-step photo tutorials. I like to think of each tutorial as sitting down with friends to learn something new together! I would love for you to stop in for a visit!
Today I’m going to share with y’all a tutorial for how to create a vibrant and fun throw pillow cover to punch up your home decor. This project was inspired by this gorgeous rug I came across on Modern Chic Home a few weeks back.
All set to make a peacock pillow of your own? Let’s get started!

For this project, you will need…
Printable Templates
An 18″ pillow form
White cotton twill fabric
Washable ink marker
Freezer paper
Grey spray paint
Felt in assorted colors
Coordinating thread
Basic sewing supplies: Machine, shears, etc.
Optional: Rotary cutter and mat
Prep Work

Print off and cut out your feather template.
Cut your twill fabric to the following dimensions:
(1) 18.5 x 18.5″ square
(2) 18.5 x 11.25″ rectangles
step 1 / Trace your template onto your freezer paper your desired number of times, and cut out your shapes. For my pillow, I used 17 feathers. Use your washable ink marker to mark the precise center of your square piece of fabric. Iron one of your feather pieces directly over this mark, taking care to ensure it is straight. Now, iron your remaining feather pieces in your desired configuration around your center piece, making sure each feather is evenly spaced as you work. 
step 2 / Spray your fabric piece evenly with your paint, applying 2-3 light, even coats. When the paint has dried, remove and discard your freezer paper pieces.
step 3 / Cut 3 pieces of freezer paper to 8.5 x 11″. Print the circle templates you downloaded above onto the dull (unshiny) side of your freezer paper. Note: For my pillow, I printed 2 sheets of the large circles and 1 of the small circles. Iron your printed templates onto your felt, distributing the circles among your different colors as desired. Carefully cut each of your circles out, and discard the freezer paper backing.
step 4 / From each of your small circles, cut a small notch, as shown. Carefully stitch these smaller pieces onto the lower portion of your larger felt circles. Place your stitched pieces at the bottom of the feather spaces on your pillow front, aligning them toward the bottom point of each feather. Carefully stitch around the perimeter of each circle to affix them to your pillow front. Repeat until each feather space contains a circle piece.
step 5 / Fold one of the long edges of one of your rectangle pieces under 1/4″; press. Fold under another 1/4″; press. Stitch this hem to secure. Repeat with the other rectangle piece. Lay your completed front panel on a work surface, right side up. Place one of your rectangle pieces on top of your front piece, right sides facing, so that the top edge and corners of each piece are aligned and the hem you just sewed runs through the center, as shown. Pin. Place your other rectangle piece over the other two pieces in a similar fashion, this time aligning the bottom edges and corners. Pin. Note: Then hemmed edges of your rectangle pieces will overlap by 3 inches at the center. Using a 1/4″ seam, stitch all the way around your pinned pieces. Clip your corners, and turn your cover right side out. Slip your cover onto your pillow form.
All finished!

Thank you so much, Jen, for having me over today! I hope to see y’all over at Positively Splendid very soon!

PhotobucketTwitter: @splendidamyFacebook: facebook.com/PositivelySplendid

 Amy – that is just so cute. 
Amy has so many wonderful ideas, I don’t know where to start. Seriously. 

{this is the first project of Amy’s that I was introduced to — Metal Flowers}

{She makes the most amazing pillows — check out these Patriotic Outdoor Pillows}

{And I adore her Boy/Girl room — she made all of the bedding — amazing}

{And another Fab idea — Personalized Nursery Canvases}
AMAZING!! Seriously, every single idea that Amy does is wonderful. You will want to see all of the new ideas at Positively Splendid!!
xoxo
PS — I made over my front door and porch today. I can’t wait to show you what I did. Here is a sneak peek: 

Have a great day!! 
xoxo

Great Ideas — Sewing Projects {1}

3 Apr
{I may be a little obsessed with making these Fabric Rosettes @ Kiki Creates }
{Get the 411 on how to make this Ruffled Easter Tee @ Positively Splendid}
{Find out how to make this adorable Ice Cream Shirt @ Serenity Now}
{These Easter Sock Vases make me smile @ JC’s Loft}

{Make a Pennant Lampshade @ A time for Everything}
{This Hoot quilt is amazing @ iCandy}
{Check out the 20 different Doll Patterns @ Tip Junkie}
{Make an Emergency Clutch to keep in your car @ TidyMom}
 {Create a Screen Printed Bunny Outfit @ Girl Inspired}
 {Makeover an armchair with Ruffles @ That’s My Letter}
{Get the 411 on how to Upholster an Armchair @ Vintage Revivals}
 {Check out this Thrift Store Transformation @ Faith, Trust and a Little Pixie Dust}
{Get the 411 on how to make these fun Butterfly Pillows @ Lady Crafter 14}
{Sew a Pleated, Wing Back Slipcover @ Crazy Wonderful}
 {Make a pretty Rosette Pillow @ Crazy Wonderful}
{Create a Stylish Wipe Case @ Curds and Whey}
{Get the 411 on how to make these Drop Cloth-lined Drapes @ Being Brook}
{Turn a Blah stroller into something extraordinary @ Laura Thoughts}
 {Find out how to recycle a favorite shirt @ Project Purple}
{Make a Ruffled Runner @ Naptime Journal}
{Make a Craft Organizer @ 2 Little Hooligans}
{Add some Oomph to a Shirt with Lace @ Maybe Matilda}
 {Find out how to make this Pretty Cardigan @ A Girl and a Glue Gun}
 {Get the 411 on how to make this Bow Shirt @ Copy Craft}
{Sew up a Bustle Back Dress @ Sweet Pea and Pumpkins}
{Sew some Ruffled Camera Straps @ My Greenbrae Cottage}
{Make a Anthro-inspired Dishtowel @ Sew Ronimo}
{Make a DIY Puppet Theater @ She Wears Flowers}
{Sew a whimsical Felt Flower Pillow @ Felt So Cute}
{Make a Sweater Egg Pillow @ Creative “Try”als}
{Make some Paper Bag Shorts @ Homestitched}
 {or a Women’s Paper Bag Skirt @ Yelllow Songbird}
 {And a Pretty and High-Waisted Apron @ Blissful and Domestic}
{Make an Initial Tote Bag @ Built it Sew it Love it }
 {Transform lingerie into a Pretty Princess Dress up Outfit @ Vixen Made}
{Dress up Plain Onesies @ My Creative Heart}
 {Check out this great Diaper Bag Tutorial @ Sisters of the Wild West}
{Find out how to make this Chef’s hat @ Better Together}
{Make a DIY Painted Shower Curtain @ My Yellow Umbrella}

These are just a few of the amazing Sewing ideas that have been linked up this week. 
My eyes are barely staying open so I am calling it quits tonight, but come by and see all of the ideas — and link up YOUR ideas and enter to win a  

Camera straps that ZIP!

Another Great Idea feature post coming up soon!! 

Happy Sunday! 


xoxo

Guest Tutorial — Make a "Helping Hand" {all-in-one apron/dishtowel/double-handed hot pad apparatus}

25 Mar
DSCF2635
Hey, fellow Tatertots and Jello fans!


I’m Tyra, and I blog over at Ucreate Foods. I want to thank Jen so much for inviting me be here today to share this fun, easy, and practical project with all of you.

It’s the ideal sewing project, even for a beginner, and it’s the perfect gift idea for upcoming Mother’s Day, bridal showers, and graduations…make them one, or make them a whole set – they’re quick, easy, fun, and versatile!
 

I’m a huge fan of Rachael Ray’s. I mean, isn’t everybody? That’s why I was so excited this Christmas when I opened a package from my mom and found a set of 3 of Rachael Ray’s moppines in there (Mom always buys the absolute best Christmas presents!). How could I not fall instantly in love with this all-in-one apron/dishtowel/double-handed hot pad apparatus?

What’s not to love? I mean, meals were bound to practically make themselves from now on with this handy helper in my kitchen! I couldn’t wait to try it out!

I almost hate to tell you this, because I’ve sort of always secretly considered Rachael Ray a BFF of mine (I swear she’s addressing me directly when I turn on 30 Minute Meals), but I was feeling kinda huffy that day when I scorched both of my hands using one of those moppines to move a pan of hot rolls from inside the oven onto the stovetop. So much for that hot pad application! Ouch, Rach!
Ooooh {fisted hands & virtual foot stomp}! I really hate being disappointed. Such a great concept…just not executed very well…

Well, no use sitting around feeling sorry for myself…
It’s a knock-off, but I modified it in a pretty important way. I guess you can say it’s a “knock-up”. (Can you imagine the tabloids? “Rachael Ray Knocked Up!”)
 I’m wicked.
I call my modified, knocked-up version the “help h@nd”.
Because now, FINALLY, help is always right @ hand.
the help h@nd collage

 
Supplies Needed:

  • 2/3 yd of 100% cotton fabric for the main body
  • 20” of coordinating 100% cotton fabric for the main body lining *
  • one package of coordinating 1/2” double-fold bias tape
  • 1/4 yd of Insul-Bright ** (find it near battings-by-the-bolt)
  • 1/3-2/3 yd of coordinating 100% cotton fabric for the inner pocket, outer pocket, and lining* of the outer pocket. You can certainly choose to use all the same print, in which case you’ll need 2/3 yd total, or you can use different prints, like I did, in which case you’ll need 1/3 yd of one print and 2/3 yd of the other.

The pattern pieces for your pockets are available to download for free from 4shared here and here. In an effort to keep this tutorial from becoming frighteningly long despite the simplicity of the project, instructions for simple assembly of the pattern pieces are posted today over at Ucreate Foods.
Once you have the two pattern pieces put together, Here are your all your cuts:

  • One 20”x30” rectangle, cut from your main fabric, for the main body. I used a fun, sort of retro looking large-apple-and-pear print in this example, but you can use any 100% cotton fabric you like…be sure to check out all my variations at the end of this post.
    the help h@nd
  • One 18”X28” rectangle, cut from a coordinating fabric (100% cotton), for the main body lining*. I used a tiny paisley.
    the help h@nd
  • Two small cones, cut using pattern piece A (I used a brown stripe in this example), for the inner portion of the pocket.
  • Two small cones, cut using pattern piece A from Insul-Bright**, for the insulation component of the inner pocket. THIS IS IMPORTANT! DON’T LEAVE THIS PART OUT!
    the help h@nd
  • Two large cones, cut using pattern piece B (I used the brown stripe in this example), for the lining of the outer pocket
  • Two large cones, cut using pattern piece B (I used a cute fruity polka dot in this example), for the outer pocket
    the help h@nd
  • two 16.5” lengths of coordinating double-fold bias tape
  • One 4” strip of coordinating double-fold bias tape, for the hanging loop
  • personalized tag, optional (but so stinkin’ fun!)…I used the tutorial here to make mine out of twill ribbon (near the bias tape in the fabric store) and a sheet of iron-on transfer paper

* If you’re using a fabric that is somehow double sided or – more likely – one that doesn’t have a right and wrong side, such as terrycloth or muslin, or if you don’t care about seeing the “wrong side” of your fabric on the inside of your help h@nd, you can leave the 18”x28” liner piece and the lining of the outer pocket out altogether. I did this on my purple terrycloth version, way at bottom. It makes the project even easier and quicker than it already is!
**If you’re not familiar with Insul-Brite, here’s a visual. It’s kind of like a slim batting, but one side has a reflective lining on it. That reflective lining should be sewn toward your source of heat. It helps block the heat from reaching your hands. Very important. Very simple. Very absent, Rachael!
the help h@nd

Part 1: The Functionality

Start with your four small cones. Consider the reflective surface the “right” side of the Insul-Bright. You want to sew the Insul-Bright so that the reflective surface faces toward the right side of the fabric you’re using for your inner pocket.
the help h@nd
This is important because you want the heat-reflective side of the Insul-Bright to end up facing the source of heat (your pot or pan!). Sew your Insul-Bright to your fabric RIGHT SIDES TOGETHER around the curve only. Leave the straight edges alone for now.
the help h@nd
Now, turn it right sides out and press.
the help h@nd
Lay your main body piece out flat, right side down, then layer your lining piece on top of it, WRONG SIDES TOGETHER, centered so that you have a margin of about 1” all the way around. That is to say, you can see about 1” of the wrong side of your main body piece all the way around underneath your lining piece.
the help h@nd
the help h@nd
Now, lay your inner pocket + insulation piece (the one you just sewed around the curve only) down on the main body piece, lining it up with the corners of the liner (or about 1” from the outside edges of the main body piece if you’re not placing a lining), and pin all four layers together. Be sure the reflective layer of Insul-Bright faces the main body piece. Not to harp, but I know first hand what will happen without insulation.
the help h@nd
Do this in any two kitty corners of the main body, so that you have this:
the help h@nd
Now, sew that curve again, with about a 1/8” seam allowance, this time to attach the inner pocket to the main body, like so:
the help h@nd
Repeat for the other inner pocket.
the help h@nd
Now, let’s put the outer pockets together. (When you get to the end of the tutorial, be sure & check out my variation with the ruffle around the pocket!) We’re working with both our large cones, WRONG SIDES TOGETHER.
the help h@nd
Cut two 16.5” lengths of your bias tape.
the help h@nd
Sew the bias tape around the pockets, along the curve only of your two large cones WRONG SIDES TOGETHER, using a 1/8” seam allowance.
the help h@nd
Trim ends of bias tape flush, if necessary.
the help h@nd

Repeat with the other two large cones for the other pocket.

Part 2: Assembling It

Now, lay your outer pocket down on top of your inner pocket (which, you’ll recall, you’ve already sewn along the curve to the main body piece). Line it up along the straight edges.
the help h@nd
Your outer pocket component will overlap your inner pocket component by about an inch at the curve. This is perfect.
the help h@nd
Pin along both straight edges, through all layers. Do this on both pockets.
the help h@nd
Now, we’ll make our side seams…
Fold your side in about 1/2”, and press it flat along the entire length.
the help h@nd
Then fold it over again (overlapping onto the pocket edges), and sew with about a 1/8” seam allowance. Do this on both sides, along the entire length of the side. This secures all side pocket components to the main body while simultaneously making your side seams.
the help h@nd
the help h@nd
Notice, we still haven’t touched our top or bottom seams. Just leave those pockets pinned in place there – we’ll get to the top & bottom seams soon.
the help h@nd

Part 3: Securing the Pocket

Now, we’ll secure our pocket and fit it to our hand. I have average hands. The seams indicated on the pattern I’ve provided should be adequate for you. If you have extra large hands, you may want to move the seams out an inch or so, but the placement of the seams on the pattern is about perfect to keep the help h@nd where you want it when you’re using it to remove a hot pan.
Pull Pattern Piece B back out. See those little blue dashes on the pattern (there are four)?
the help h@nd
Place your pattern on top of your pocket, lining it up at the corners and edges. Then, line a straight edge up along those dashes…
the help h@nd
Fold your pattern up onto the straight edge, and use your fabric pencil to mark a line along the straight edge onto the fabric.
DSCF2433
DSCF2615
Now remove your straight edge and pattern.
DSCF2617

…and sew along the lines.
the help h@nd
These seams help hold the help h@nd nicely around your hands while you’re trying to take a hot pan out of the oven, and they keep the pocket from gaping open when it’s hanging.
the help h@nd

Part 4: Finishing

We’re almost done…let’s just put our hanging loop & label (if desired) on there!
Sew along the open edge of your little 4” piece of bias tape, using a 1/8” seam allowance.
the help h@nd
Take the strip, lay it down RIGHT SIDE UP, and fold up 1” of one end at a 90 degree angle, like so:
the help h@nd
…and press. Do the same on the other end.
the help h@nd
Fold top of main body piece down 1/2” and press. Just like you did on the sides before.
the help h@nd
Find the center of the main body piece by folding it in half (sides together) and placing a pin right at the fold on the lining side.
the help h@nd
the help h@nd
Open it back up. Now that pin marks the center. Center your loop on either side of your pin.
the help h@nd
Make sure each side of the loop will be caught under your next 1/2” fold (when you make your final seam) and pin in place at both ends. Now’s also the time to place your tag, if you want one. These tags are so fun and easy, and they add a cute, personal touch to any hand-made gift. I also like to attach them to anything that I make for my kids, in hopes that one day they’ll discover that all their most treasured possessions have this one little thing in common.
the help h@nd
Clip the corners of your side seams at a 45 degree angle before folding and sewing your top & bottom seams. This will just make a prettier, more square seam at the corners.
the help h@nd
Now, just fold that edge over another 1/2”, overlapping onto the top of the pocket, and sew in place along the entire length, using a 1/8” seam allowance. Repeat on the bottom seam.
the help h@nd
I like to come back and reinforce the seam right over that hanging loop, just in case somebody tugs a little too hard on there. the help h@nd
You’re done!  Now go make dinner!
the help h@nd
the help h@nd
the help h@nd

Step 5: Use It!

(So sorry the background noise is like the Duggars at the zoo…it’s really only just two hungry kids & a pair of bossy dogs!)


Step 6: Make A Hundred More!

This is such a fast & easy project! I love it because you can modify the dimensions slightly to accommodate your fabric stash.
Here’s one I did entirely out of terrycloth. It’s one of my favorites. It’s also a little less than 18” in that dimension. I used a purple terrycloth remnant that I found, and I only had enough fabric to make it 16”x28”.  This variation comes together a few minutes more quickly because you don’t have to cut a liner or outer pocket liner.
the help h@nd
Here’s one I did out to use up some flannel scraps I had. The flannel is surprisingly absorbent, and I love it because it’s so soft. And cute…I’m a total sucker for paisley! the help h@nd
the help h@nd
And here’s one that I did from my stash of simple muslin. I made this one to match my Frills Over Thrills apron, and I just love the variation of the ruffle instead of bias tape on the pocket. It really only takes a few minutes longer to make that sweet little ruffle.
the help h@nd
the help h@nd
the help h@nd
The next one I make, I want to do an monogrammed applique on the pocket – won’t that be fun?
Once you get one of these made (please send me a picture!), you’ll never want to be in your kitchen without one. I usually have two out at once, and I have almost an entire drawer dedicated to my help h@nds. I so hope you enjoy making and using these as much as I do!
DSCF2635
the help h@nd
I do hope you get a chance to visit me over at Ucreate Foods one of these days… Since Ucreate Foods is primarily a feature blog, I’m looking forward to receiving your emails and your recipe submissions for possible future features! That will help me get to know you, too – something I look forward to very much! Oh, and those few of you who might already know me know that whenever I do a tutorial for a project like this I usually like to follow it up by holding a giveaway for a custom-made one. 
Or two.
Just sayin’.

Uh-oh. Did that sound like a bribe?

Well, the way I see it, when you lose a BFF of Rachael Ray’s caliber, you’re probably going to need to pick up at least a few replacements! 
Thanks again, Jen! 

Thanks Tyra! 
What a great idea
 And it would make such a great Mother’s Day gift this year!! 
Here are just a few of Tyra’s great ideas at UCreate Foods: 
{Once a month Tyra and her family do a challenge called “Dad Does Dinner” and share a great Dad recipe which her husband cooks!! And readers can submit THEIR Daddy Cooks favorites}
 {In February, in honor of Valentine’s Day, Tyra and UCreate Foods had a Sweetheart Challenge where readers could recreate their sweetheart’s favorite meal and submit the recipe}
{And check out Tyra’s Cute Magnetic Menu Board Tutorial}
Those are just a few things happening at UCreate Foods.  
Be sure to head over and check it out!!
So much fun!!! 
and…
PS — I am sharing a few ways that I decorate with Whimsy in my home today at 
while Victoria is on vacation. She is also having a whimsical giveaway for some treasures — come over and leave a comment to enter to win! You will love her blog. She creates incredible projects!
PPSIt’s Friday!! You know what that means!! It’s time for YOU to show off YOUR ideas. I can’t wait to see them. And, this week I have a giveaway for the man in your life. Come join the party and kick of your weekend at 6 pm {mst}. I can’t wait!!! 
xoxoox



This post sponsored by

Guest Tutorial — Make a "Helping Hand" {all-in-one apron/dishtowel/double-handed hot pad apparatus}

25 Mar
DSCF2635
Hey, fellow Tatertots and Jello fans!


I’m Tyra, and I blog over at Ucreate Foods. I want to thank Jen so much for inviting me be here today to share this fun, easy, and practical project with all of you.

It’s the ideal sewing project, even for a beginner, and it’s the perfect gift idea for upcoming Mother’s Day, bridal showers, and graduations…make them one, or make them a whole set – they’re quick, easy, fun, and versatile!
 

I’m a huge fan of Rachael Ray’s. I mean, isn’t everybody? That’s why I was so excited this Christmas when I opened a package from my mom and found a set of 3 of Rachael Ray’s moppines in there (Mom always buys the absolute best Christmas presents!). How could I not fall instantly in love with this all-in-one apron/dishtowel/double-handed hot pad apparatus?

What’s not to love? I mean, meals were bound to practically make themselves from now on with this handy helper in my kitchen! I couldn’t wait to try it out!

I almost hate to tell you this, because I’ve sort of always secretly considered Rachael Ray a BFF of mine (I swear she’s addressing me directly when I turn on 30 Minute Meals), but I was feeling kinda huffy that day when I scorched both of my hands using one of those moppines to move a pan of hot rolls from inside the oven onto the stovetop. So much for that hot pad application! Ouch, Rach!
Ooooh {fisted hands & virtual foot stomp}! I really hate being disappointed. Such a great concept…just not executed very well…

Well, no use sitting around feeling sorry for myself…
It’s a knock-off, but I modified it in a pretty important way. I guess you can say it’s a “knock-up”. (Can you imagine the tabloids? “Rachael Ray Knocked Up!”)
 I’m wicked.
I call my modified, knocked-up version the “help h@nd”.
Because now, FINALLY, help is always right @ hand.
the help h@nd collage

 
Supplies Needed:

  • 2/3 yd of 100% cotton fabric for the main body
  • 20” of coordinating 100% cotton fabric for the main body lining *
  • one package of coordinating 1/2” double-fold bias tape
  • 1/4 yd of Insul-Bright ** (find it near battings-by-the-bolt)
  • 1/3-2/3 yd of coordinating 100% cotton fabric for the inner pocket, outer pocket, and lining* of the outer pocket. You can certainly choose to use all the same print, in which case you’ll need 2/3 yd total, or you can use different prints, like I did, in which case you’ll need 1/3 yd of one print and 2/3 yd of the other.

The pattern pieces for your pockets are available to download for free from 4shared here and here. In an effort to keep this tutorial from becoming frighteningly long despite the simplicity of the project, instructions for simple assembly of the pattern pieces are posted today over at Ucreate Foods.
Once you have the two pattern pieces put together, Here are your all your cuts:

  • One 20”x30” rectangle, cut from your main fabric, for the main body. I used a fun, sort of retro looking large-apple-and-pear print in this example, but you can use any 100% cotton fabric you like…be sure to check out all my variations at the end of this post.
    the help h@nd
  • One 18”X28” rectangle, cut from a coordinating fabric (100% cotton), for the main body lining*. I used a tiny paisley.
    the help h@nd
  • Two small cones, cut using pattern piece A (I used a brown stripe in this example), for the inner portion of the pocket.
  • Two small cones, cut using pattern piece A from Insul-Bright**, for the insulation component of the inner pocket. THIS IS IMPORTANT! DON’T LEAVE THIS PART OUT!
    the help h@nd
  • Two large cones, cut using pattern piece B (I used the brown stripe in this example), for the lining of the outer pocket
  • Two large cones, cut using pattern piece B (I used a cute fruity polka dot in this example), for the outer pocket
    the help h@nd
  • two 16.5” lengths of coordinating double-fold bias tape
  • One 4” strip of coordinating double-fold bias tape, for the hanging loop
  • personalized tag, optional (but so stinkin’ fun!)…I used the tutorial here to make mine out of twill ribbon (near the bias tape in the fabric store) and a sheet of iron-on transfer paper

* If you’re using a fabric that is somehow double sided or – more likely – one that doesn’t have a right and wrong side, such as terrycloth or muslin, or if you don’t care about seeing the “wrong side” of your fabric on the inside of your help h@nd, you can leave the 18”x28” liner piece and the lining of the outer pocket out altogether. I did this on my purple terrycloth version, way at bottom. It makes the project even easier and quicker than it already is!
**If you’re not familiar with Insul-Brite, here’s a visual. It’s kind of like a slim batting, but one side has a reflective lining on it. That reflective lining should be sewn toward your source of heat. It helps block the heat from reaching your hands. Very important. Very simple. Very absent, Rachael!
the help h@nd

Part 1: The Functionality

Start with your four small cones. Consider the reflective surface the “right” side of the Insul-Bright. You want to sew the Insul-Bright so that the reflective surface faces toward the right side of the fabric you’re using for your inner pocket.
the help h@nd
This is important because you want the heat-reflective side of the Insul-Bright to end up facing the source of heat (your pot or pan!). Sew your Insul-Bright to your fabric RIGHT SIDES TOGETHER around the curve only. Leave the straight edges alone for now.
the help h@nd
Now, turn it right sides out and press.
the help h@nd
Lay your main body piece out flat, right side down, then layer your lining piece on top of it, WRONG SIDES TOGETHER, centered so that you have a margin of about 1” all the way around. That is to say, you can see about 1” of the wrong side of your main body piece all the way around underneath your lining piece.
the help h@nd
the help h@nd
Now, lay your inner pocket + insulation piece (the one you just sewed around the curve only) down on the main body piece, lining it up with the corners of the liner (or about 1” from the outside edges of the main body piece if you’re not placing a lining), and pin all four layers together. Be sure the reflective layer of Insul-Bright faces the main body piece. Not to harp, but I know first hand what will happen without insulation.
the help h@nd
Do this in any two kitty corners of the main body, so that you have this:
the help h@nd
Now, sew that curve again, with about a 1/8” seam allowance, this time to attach the inner pocket to the main body, like so:
the help h@nd
Repeat for the other inner pocket.
the help h@nd
Now, let’s put the outer pockets together. (When you get to the end of the tutorial, be sure & check out my variation with the ruffle around the pocket!) We’re working with both our large cones, WRONG SIDES TOGETHER.
the help h@nd
Cut two 16.5” lengths of your bias tape.
the help h@nd
Sew the bias tape around the pockets, along the curve only of your two large cones WRONG SIDES TOGETHER, using a 1/8” seam allowance.
the help h@nd
Trim ends of bias tape flush, if necessary.
the help h@nd

Repeat with the other two large cones for the other pocket.

Part 2: Assembling It

Now, lay your outer pocket down on top of your inner pocket (which, you’ll recall, you’ve already sewn along the curve to the main body piece). Line it up along the straight edges.
the help h@nd
Your outer pocket component will overlap your inner pocket component by about an inch at the curve. This is perfect.
the help h@nd
Pin along both straight edges, through all layers. Do this on both pockets.
the help h@nd
Now, we’ll make our side seams…
Fold your side in about 1/2”, and press it flat along the entire length.
the help h@nd
Then fold it over again (overlapping onto the pocket edges), and sew with about a 1/8” seam allowance. Do this on both sides, along the entire length of the side. This secures all side pocket components to the main body while simultaneously making your side seams.
the help h@nd
the help h@nd
Notice, we still haven’t touched our top or bottom seams. Just leave those pockets pinned in place there – we’ll get to the top & bottom seams soon.
the help h@nd

Part 3: Securing the Pocket

Now, we’ll secure our pocket and fit it to our hand. I have average hands. The seams indicated on the pattern I’ve provided should be adequate for you. If you have extra large hands, you may want to move the seams out an inch or so, but the placement of the seams on the pattern is about perfect to keep the help h@nd where you want it when you’re using it to remove a hot pan.
Pull Pattern Piece B back out. See those little blue dashes on the pattern (there are four)?
the help h@nd
Place your pattern on top of your pocket, lining it up at the corners and edges. Then, line a straight edge up along those dashes…
the help h@nd
Fold your pattern up onto the straight edge, and use your fabric pencil to mark a line along the straight edge onto the fabric.
DSCF2433
DSCF2615
Now remove your straight edge and pattern.
DSCF2617

…and sew along the lines.
the help h@nd
These seams help hold the help h@nd nicely around your hands while you’re trying to take a hot pan out of the oven, and they keep the pocket from gaping open when it’s hanging.
the help h@nd

Part 4: Finishing

We’re almost done…let’s just put our hanging loop & label (if desired) on there!
Sew along the open edge of your little 4” piece of bias tape, using a 1/8” seam allowance.
the help h@nd
Take the strip, lay it down RIGHT SIDE UP, and fold up 1” of one end at a 90 degree angle, like so:
the help h@nd
…and press. Do the same on the other end.
the help h@nd
Fold top of main body piece down 1/2” and press. Just like you did on the sides before.
the help h@nd
Find the center of the main body piece by folding it in half (sides together) and placing a pin right at the fold on the lining side.
the help h@nd
the help h@nd
Open it back up. Now that pin marks the center. Center your loop on either side of your pin.
the help h@nd
Make sure each side of the loop will be caught under your next 1/2” fold (when you make your final seam) and pin in place at both ends. Now’s also the time to place your tag, if you want one. These tags are so fun and easy, and they add a cute, personal touch to any hand-made gift. I also like to attach them to anything that I make for my kids, in hopes that one day they’ll discover that all their most treasured possessions have this one little thing in common.
the help h@nd
Clip the corners of your side seams at a 45 degree angle before folding and sewing your top & bottom seams. This will just make a prettier, more square seam at the corners.
the help h@nd
Now, just fold that edge over another 1/2”, overlapping onto the top of the pocket, and sew in place along the entire length, using a 1/8” seam allowance. Repeat on the bottom seam.
the help h@nd
I like to come back and reinforce the seam right over that hanging loop, just in case somebody tugs a little too hard on there. the help h@nd
You’re done!  Now go make dinner!
the help h@nd
the help h@nd
the help h@nd

Step 5: Use It!

(So sorry the background noise is like the Duggars at the zoo…it’s really only just two hungry kids & a pair of bossy dogs!)


Step 6: Make A Hundred More!

This is such a fast & easy project! I love it because you can modify the dimensions slightly to accommodate your fabric stash.
Here’s one I did entirely out of terrycloth. It’s one of my favorites. It’s also a little less than 18” in that dimension. I used a purple terrycloth remnant that I found, and I only had enough fabric to make it 16”x28”.  This variation comes together a few minutes more quickly because you don’t have to cut a liner or outer pocket liner.
the help h@nd
Here’s one I did out to use up some flannel scraps I had. The flannel is surprisingly absorbent, and I love it because it’s so soft. And cute…I’m a total sucker for paisley! the help h@nd
the help h@nd
And here’s one that I did from my stash of simple muslin. I made this one to match my Frills Over Thrills apron, and I just love the variation of the ruffle instead of bias tape on the pocket. It really only takes a few minutes longer to make that sweet little ruffle.
the help h@nd
the help h@nd
the help h@nd
The next one I make, I want to do an monogrammed applique on the pocket – won’t that be fun?
Once you get one of these made (please send me a picture!), you’ll never want to be in your kitchen without one. I usually have two out at once, and I have almost an entire drawer dedicated to my help h@nds. I so hope you enjoy making and using these as much as I do!
DSCF2635
the help h@nd
I do hope you get a chance to visit me over at Ucreate Foods one of these days… Since Ucreate Foods is primarily a feature blog, I’m looking forward to receiving your emails and your recipe submissions for possible future features! That will help me get to know you, too – something I look forward to very much! Oh, and those few of you who might already know me know that whenever I do a tutorial for a project like this I usually like to follow it up by holding a giveaway for a custom-made one. 
Or two.
Just sayin’.

Uh-oh. Did that sound like a bribe?

Well, the way I see it, when you lose a BFF of Rachael Ray’s caliber, you’re probably going to need to pick up at least a few replacements! 
Thanks again, Jen! 

Thanks Tyra! 
What a great idea
 And it would make such a great Mother’s Day gift this year!! 
Here are just a few of Tyra’s great ideas at UCreate Foods: 
{Once a month Tyra and her family do a challenge called “Dad Does Dinner” and share a great Dad recipe which her husband cooks!! And readers can submit THEIR Daddy Cooks favorites}
 {In February, in honor of Valentine’s Day, Tyra and UCreate Foods had a Sweetheart Challenge where readers could recreate their sweetheart’s favorite meal and submit the recipe}
{And check out Tyra’s Cute Magnetic Menu Board Tutorial}
Those are just a few things happening at UCreate Foods.  
Be sure to head over and check it out!!
So much fun!!! 
and…
PS — I am sharing a few ways that I decorate with Whimsy in my home today at 
while Victoria is on vacation. She is also having a whimsical giveaway for some treasures — come over and leave a comment to enter to win! You will love her blog. She creates incredible projects!
PPSIt’s Friday!! You know what that means!! It’s time for YOU to show off YOUR ideas. I can’t wait to see them. And, this week I have a giveaway for the man in your life. Come join the party and kick of your weekend at 6 pm {mst}. I can’t wait!!! 
xoxoox



This post sponsored by

Guest Project — Turn a Purse into a Stylish Camera Bag!!!

18 Mar
Hello, fellow readers of Tater Tots and Jello!  This is Valerie, from The Crafter’s File Box.  
I am super excited to hijack Jen’s blog today and share with you my tutorial for making a regular purse go to fab camera bag!

I am sure you have all see the amazing camera bags that have been out there lately.  They look like a purse, so they are still feminine, but the insides are made to function like a camera bag. 
LOVE IT!
What I didn’t love was the price.  I would rather spend the $$ on equipment than a bag, so I created my own.
Here’s how you do it…

STEP ONE:  Find the right kind of bag.
Look for one that has a more rigid outside, like leather or coated nylon, which is what I am using here.  Then, look at the innards.  You want to find one that has a larger base, with SEAMS going down the middle and across the two ends.  Lastly, check to make sure you are comfortable with the strap.  You want to make sure you can wear it AND shoot with it on. 
STEP TWO:  Turn the bag inside out.
STEP THREE:  Open the seam along the middle with a seam ripper.
Stop about 1/2 inch before the ends.

STEP FOUR:  Make the bottom.

(Is it totally childish that I laughed a bit at typing “bottom”?)
Cut plastic needle point canvas to the dimensions of your bag’s bottom. (snicker)
STEP FIVE:  Cut headliner fabric to fit the canvas.
Headliner fabric is the fabric they use to uphoslter car ceilings.  I found mine at Jo-Anns.  You could substitute any foam or neoprene type fabric’s here.  If you would like to make your bag even more plush, you could double the headliner fabric here and wrap the canvas twice!

STEP SIX:  Wrap the fabric around the fabric and sew ends closed.
It doesn’t have to be pretty or perfect.  This will be going inside the lining, so no one will ever see it!
STEP SEVEN:  Repeat Steps 4-6, but use the SIDES of the bag as your template.
You might have to sew the canvas together at places to make it long enough to wrap the whole bag.  I simply
overlapped it for about two bars and did a straight stitch down.

Your finished pieces should look something like this!
STEP EIGHT: Reinforce your bag.
This is where we give your regular bag more support so that it can cushion your camera in safety.
This is done in two parts, going through the hole you cut with the seam ripper at the bottom of your bag.
Take your long, side piece and “stuff” it through the bottom and put it into place at the sides.  It should look like this when done.

After the sides are in place, put the short, bottom piece in place at the bottom.

STEP NINE:  Pin the bottom closed with straight pins.
Try to follow the bags original seams and make sure the raw edges are folded over so it looks neat.
STEP TEN: Sew closed with a blanket stitch.
You can stop here if you don’t carry additional lenses, but for those of you who would like lens dividers… read on!
STEP ELEVEN:  Repeat Steps 4-6 , but this time measure the width of the bag.

You will want to add about 1/2 inch to your measurement on the sides, so you can sew a velcro strip on each side.
STEP TWELVE:  With a high adhesive glue, like E- 6000, apply glue to the mates of the velcro on the divider.

STEP TWELVE:  Apply the glued pieces to the sides of the bag where you want the divider.

…and it should look like this after you insert the divider!
Ahh.. safe and cozy lenses. 🙂  You can repeat as many times as you like to give yourself a custom made inside.  Also, you could cover the divider with a custom fabric to match the insides for a fun, high end look.  Just sew on the velcro AFTER sewing on the fabric.
And that, my friends is how you go….

Thanks for having me at Tatertots and  Jello, Jen!  Hope to see you all over at The Crafter’s File Box from time to time!
Disclaimer: I cannot guarantee the safety of your camera if you use the tutorial.  You assume all risks if you make your own camera bag using this tutorial. I can say that I have used my bag for over a year now, with no incidents whatsoever.  Use your best personal judgement and care when handling an sort of electronic equipment.  Whew! Had to get that out there! 🙂

Valerie — that is GENIUS!!! 



I love it!! Thank you so much such an awesome tutorial!!! 
If you don’t follow The Crafter’s Filebox, you are missing out!  

Valerie has great ideas on her blog!

Like:


{Royal Tea Towel tutorial guest post by the Magic Bean on The Crafter’s File Box}

https://importtestsite.files.wordpress.com/2011/03/151.jpg
 {check out Valerie’s Amazing Kitchen Redo – love that colored beadboard}

And, Valerie has a beautiful and smart new business. She has come up with these beautiful camera strap covers that ZIP Zipcoverz.  Such a great idea!!

You will love the ideas at The Crafter’s File Box! 




xoxo



PS It’s Friday. You know what that means!!! It’s time to show off YOUR ideas. Come party with me at The Weekend Wrap Up Party tonight — it’s gonna be fun. The linky goes up at 6 pm {MST}. I can’t wait to spotlight YOU! 




xoxo

This post sponsored by

Guest Project — Turn a Purse into a Stylish Camera Bag!!!

18 Mar
Hello, fellow readers of Tater Tots and Jello!  This is Valerie, from The Crafter’s File Box.  
I am super excited to hijack Jen’s blog today and share with you my tutorial for making a regular purse go to fab camera bag!

I am sure you have all see the amazing camera bags that have been out there lately.  They look like a purse, so they are still feminine, but the insides are made to function like a camera bag. 
LOVE IT!
What I didn’t love was the price.  I would rather spend the $$ on equipment than a bag, so I created my own.
Here’s how you do it…

STEP ONE:  Find the right kind of bag.
Look for one that has a more rigid outside, like leather or coated nylon, which is what I am using here.  Then, look at the innards.  You want to find one that has a larger base, with SEAMS going down the middle and across the two ends.  Lastly, check to make sure you are comfortable with the strap.  You want to make sure you can wear it AND shoot with it on. 
STEP TWO:  Turn the bag inside out.
STEP THREE:  Open the seam along the middle with a seam ripper.
Stop about 1/2 inch before the ends.

STEP FOUR:  Make the bottom.

(Is it totally childish that I laughed a bit at typing “bottom”?)
Cut plastic needle point canvas to the dimensions of your bag’s bottom. (snicker)
STEP FIVE:  Cut headliner fabric to fit the canvas.
Headliner fabric is the fabric they use to uphoslter car ceilings.  I found mine at Jo-Anns.  You could substitute any foam or neoprene type fabric’s here.  If you would like to make your bag even more plush, you could double the headliner fabric here and wrap the canvas twice!

STEP SIX:  Wrap the fabric around the fabric and sew ends closed.
It doesn’t have to be pretty or perfect.  This will be going inside the lining, so no one will ever see it!
STEP SEVEN:  Repeat Steps 4-6, but use the SIDES of the bag as your template.
You might have to sew the canvas together at places to make it long enough to wrap the whole bag.  I simply
overlapped it for about two bars and did a straight stitch down.

Your finished pieces should look something like this!
STEP EIGHT: Reinforce your bag.
This is where we give your regular bag more support so that it can cushion your camera in safety.
This is done in two parts, going through the hole you cut with the seam ripper at the bottom of your bag.
Take your long, side piece and “stuff” it through the bottom and put it into place at the sides.  It should look like this when done.

After the sides are in place, put the short, bottom piece in place at the bottom.

STEP NINE:  Pin the bottom closed with straight pins.
Try to follow the bags original seams and make sure the raw edges are folded over so it looks neat.
STEP TEN: Sew closed with a blanket stitch.
You can stop here if you don’t carry additional lenses, but for those of you who would like lens dividers… read on!
STEP ELEVEN:  Repeat Steps 4-6 , but this time measure the width of the bag.

You will want to add about 1/2 inch to your measurement on the sides, so you can sew a velcro strip on each side.
STEP TWELVE:  With a high adhesive glue, like E- 6000, apply glue to the mates of the velcro on the divider.

STEP TWELVE:  Apply the glued pieces to the sides of the bag where you want the divider.

…and it should look like this after you insert the divider!
Ahh.. safe and cozy lenses. 🙂  You can repeat as many times as you like to give yourself a custom made inside.  Also, you could cover the divider with a custom fabric to match the insides for a fun, high end look.  Just sew on the velcro AFTER sewing on the fabric.
And that, my friends is how you go….

Thanks for having me at Tatertots and  Jello, Jen!  Hope to see you all over at The Crafter’s File Box from time to time!
Disclaimer: I cannot guarantee the safety of your camera if you use the tutorial.  You assume all risks if you make your own camera bag using this tutorial. I can say that I have used my bag for over a year now, with no incidents whatsoever.  Use your best personal judgement and care when handling an sort of electronic equipment.  Whew! Had to get that out there! 🙂

Valerie — that is GENIUS!!! 



I love it!! Thank you so much such an awesome tutorial!!! 
If you don’t follow The Crafter’s Filebox, you are missing out!  

Valerie has great ideas on her blog!

Like:


{Royal Tea Towel tutorial guest post by the Magic Bean on The Crafter’s File Box}

https://importtestsite.files.wordpress.com/2011/03/15.jpg
 {check out Valerie’s Amazing Kitchen Redo – love that colored beadboard}

And, Valerie has a beautiful and smart new business. She has come up with these beautiful camera strap covers that ZIP Zipcoverz.  Such a great idea!!

You will love the ideas at The Crafter’s File Box! 




xoxo



PS It’s Friday. You know what that means!!! It’s time to show off YOUR ideas. Come party with me at The Weekend Wrap Up Party tonight — it’s gonna be fun. The linky goes up at 6 pm {MST}. I can’t wait to spotlight YOU! 




xoxo

This post sponsored by